Campfire OK: A Song For The 'Strange'

Campfire OK's "Strange Like We Are" grows as it goes,   with handclaps and three-part harmonies culminating in powerful   choruses. i i

Campfire OK's "Strange Like We Are" grows as it goes, with handclaps and three-part harmonies culminating in powerful choruses. Kyle Johnson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Kyle Johnson/Courtesy of the artist
Campfire OK's "Strange Like We Are" grows as it goes,   with handclaps and three-part harmonies culminating in powerful   choruses.

Campfire OK's "Strange Like We Are" grows as it goes, with handclaps and three-part harmonies culminating in powerful choruses.

Kyle Johnson/Courtesy of the artist

Friday's Pick

Song: "Strange Like We Are"

Artist: Campfire OK

CD: Strange Like We Are

Genre: Rock

Campfire OK was just a duo when Mychal Goodweather first began work on the band's debut, Strange Like We Are. He, along with his drummer, emerged from the studio with piano, bass, drum and vocal tracks. But soon after returning home, Goodweather started recruiting additional Seattle musicians to play on the record. Banjos and horns soon made their way into the mix and, as Goodweather told the blog Mid-By-Northwest, these session musicians became permanent members of the band.

Campfire OK is now a hearty sextet, but that fact is easily concealed during the band's more delicate moments. The title track from Strange Like We Are quickly bursts open with a forceful chorus: "All we see are blue pastels and deep V-necks / so why don't we go somewhere we all know / where everyone we meet is strange like we are." It's not clear whether Goodweather is lamenting Seattle culture, the indie-rock dress code or something else altogether, but his words and melody are fun and memorable, regardless. "Strange Like We Are" grows as it goes, with its many layers, including handclaps and three-part harmonies, culminating in more powerful choruses.

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