NPR logo

Back To Work For Most Of Egypt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133729660/133729649" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Back To Work For Most Of Egypt

Middle East

Back To Work For Most Of Egypt

Back To Work For Most Of Egypt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133729660/133729649" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Egypt Sunday, it's the start of the work week. Weary but jubilant protesters are returning home or to jobs after a popular uprising that toppled the regime of Hosni Mubarak. But police scuffled with some of the activists who have vowed to stay on in Tahrir Square until they're sure the country's military rulers accede to their agenda. Guest host Audie Cornish updates the news from Egypt.

AUDIE CORNISH, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish in for Liane Hansen.

(Soundbite of traffic)

CORNISH: In Egypt today, it's the start of the workweek. Weary but jubilant protestors are returning home or to jobs after a popular uprising that toppled the regime of Hosni Mubarak.

The military today said they are dissolving parliament and suspending the constitution, two key demands of pro-democracy protesters. But soldiers scuffled with some of the activists who vowed to stay on in Tahrir Square until all their demands are met.

Elsewhere in the region, inspired and emboldened by Egypt's example, people have taken to the streets. In Yemen, protesters were beaten back by police for the third straight day in a row. In Bahrain, a march is planned for tomorrow.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.