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'Jeopardy' Round 1: Man Vs. Machine

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'Jeopardy' Round 1: Man Vs. Machine

Games & Humor

'Jeopardy' Round 1: Man Vs. Machine

'Jeopardy' Round 1: Man Vs. Machine

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133771091/133768973" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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In the Jeopardy! battle of man vs. machine, man and machine were neck-and-neck on Monday. Human player Brad Rutter and the supercomputer named Watson ended an initial round tied at $5,000. The other challenger, Ken Jennings, had $2,000.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The answer is: the winner of the first round of a contest between human brains and a computer. The question: who is nobody? It was a tie.

In a game of "Jeopardy!" IBM supercomputer Watson took on two of the game show's most successful players. One of them, Brad Rutter, tied Watson in the first round. Ken Jennings, who holds the record for longest "Jeopardy!" winning streak is in third place.

(Soundbite of "Jeopardy!" theme song)

INSKEEP: Watson, the supercomputer, did make some mistakes during the show. He even once repeating an answer just given by another contestant. That answer was wrong both times. No doubt the computer was distracted by this song.

Round two will air tonight. The final is Wednesday. The winner takes home $1 million.

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