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Wis. Bill Slashes Collective Bargaining Rights
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Wis. Bill Slashes Collective Bargaining Rights

Business

Wis. Bill Slashes Collective Bargaining Rights

Wis. Bill Slashes Collective Bargaining Rights
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Lawmakers in Wisconsin are preparing to vote on a bill being called the most aggressive anti-union proposal in the country. Republican Gov. Scott Walker says his bill is aimed at helping state and local governments save money and balance their budgets.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with Wisconsin's proposed budget cuts.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: Lawmakers in Wisconsin are preparing to vote on a bill being called the most aggressive anti-union proposal in the country. The state's Republican Governor Scott Walker says his bill is aimed at helping state and local governments save money and balance their budgets.

The bill would slash collective bargaining rights for public workers. It would require state employees to pay half the cost of their pensions and more of their health care premiums, more than double than what they pay now.

Thousands of teachers, nurses, prison guards and other public employees packed the state Capitol yesterday to protest that bill.

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