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Toho Wants Honda To End Look-Alike Godzilla Ad
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Toho Wants Honda To End Look-Alike Godzilla Ad

Business

Toho Wants Honda To End Look-Alike Godzilla Ad

Toho Wants Honda To End Look-Alike Godzilla Ad
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Toho, the Japanese movie studio that holds Godzilla's copyrights, is suing Honda. The car company put an image that looks a lot like the bully reptile in a recent minivan commercial. Does the fiery lizard head really belong to Godzilla? Honda isn't saying, and it's still airing the commercial.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

There is one car commercial that would make Godzilla very, very angry. And that's our last word in business today.

Toho, the Japanese movie studio that holds Godzilla's copyrights, is suing Honda. The car company put an image that looks a lot like the bully reptile in a recent mini-van commercial. Toho wants Honda to pull this ad.

(Soundbite of Honda advertisement)

(Soundbite of song, "Godzilla")

INSKEEP: As electric guitars blare, an actor playing a young dad is amazed by the van. He looks inside. He sees the video entertainment system. And on the screen of that entertainment system is the rock band Judas Priest, along with a quick shot of a fire-spitting monster.

And that is the key question in the lawsuit: Does that fiery lizard head really belong to Godzilla? Honda's not saying, and it's still airing the commercial.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

(Soundbite of song, "Godzilla")

BLUE OYSTER CULT (Rock band): (Singing) History shows again and again, how nature points out the folly of men. Godzilla.

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