The Head And The Heart: One More For Winter A Seattle sextet with a flair for warm gentility, The Head and the Heart oozes good-natured winsomeness in "Winter Song," which finds the band likening a fading love to the arrival of a bleak season.
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'Winter Song' by The Head and the Heart

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The Head And The Heart: One More For Winter

Review

The Head And The Heart: One More For Winter

'Winter Song' by The Head and the Heart

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A Seattle sextet with a flair for warm gentility, The Head and the Heart oozes good-natured winsomeness in "Winter Song." Kyle Johnson/Courtesy of Sub Pop Records hide caption

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Kyle Johnson/Courtesy of Sub Pop Records

A Seattle sextet with a flair for warm gentility, The Head and the Heart oozes good-natured winsomeness in "Winter Song."

Kyle Johnson/Courtesy of Sub Pop Records

Tuesday's Pick

Song: "Winter Song"

Artist: The Head and the Heart

CD: The Head and the Heart

Genre: Folk

In the Pacific Northwest, for every three trees, there's a bearded folk-rock singer with an acoustic guitar and the voice of an angel. At this point, there's little novelty to the mold set by the likes of Fleet Foxes — multi-part vocal harmonies, soaring but delicate arrangements — which means that bands in the genre must separate themselves through good old-fashioned execution. If the songs aren't there, if they don't speak to a universal truth or tap into an authentic emotion, then there's little chance of being heard amongst the sweetly crooned din.

A Seattle sextet with a flair for warm gentility, The Head and the Heart practically oozes good-natured winsomeness in "Winter Song," which finds the band likening a fading love to the arrival of a bleak season. Along the way, the group showcases its abundance of members capable of singing lead — Josiah Johnson, Jon Russell and Charity Thielen each take a verse here, to enormously pleasing effect — while even finding room for a ray of hope at the end. As February gets set to wind to a merciful close, "Winter Song" provides a welcome reminder that each season has a purpose, even if it's only to end.