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Indiana Restaurant Accused Of Poor Taste

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Indiana Restaurant Accused Of Poor Taste

Business

Indiana Restaurant Accused Of Poor Taste

Indiana Restaurant Accused Of Poor Taste

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133986473/133986448" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The billboards for the Hacienda restaurant read: We're Like a Cult with Better Kool-Aid. People complained about the reference to the 1978 Jonestown Massacre. The restaurant took down the billboards and says it's working on a new slogan.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And let's go from one questionable marketing move to another. Our last word in business is poor taste.

A restaurant in my home state of Indiana, northern Indiana, recently put up billboards that read: We're like a cult, with better Kool-Aid.

The Hacienda Mexican Restaurant also said its drinks were to die for. People complained about these references to the 1970s Jonestown massacre in South America, where more than 900 cult members died after drinking cyanide-laced grape punch.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: The restaurant took down the billboards and said okay, they'll work on a new slogan.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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