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Clinton, European Leaders Discuss Gadhafi's Regime

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Clinton, European Leaders Discuss Gadhafi's Regime

Africa

Clinton, European Leaders Discuss Gadhafi's Regime

Clinton, European Leaders Discuss Gadhafi's Regime

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in Geneva, consulting with European partners on how to end the bloodshed in Libya. The United Nations Security Council authorized an arms embargo and targeted sanctions against Gadhafi and his close associates.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is meeting with European leaders in Geneva today. Their goal is to bring about an end to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's regime - and do it, if possible, without further bloodshed. NPRs Michele Kelemen is traveling with the secretary.

MICHELE KELEMEN: Now that Americans have been evacuated and out of harm's way, U.S. officials say they are looking at a range of options to deal with the crisis in Libya. The UN Security Council authorized an arms embargo, and targeted sanctions against Gadhafi and his close associates. And Secretary Clinton is talking to her European counterparts in Geneva on ways to enforce that.

Secretary HILLARY CLINTON (Department of State): Nothing is off the table, so long as the Libyan government continues to threaten and kill Libyans.

KELEMEN: Officials traveling with her acknowledge that Gadhafi may not be rational enough to respond to sanctions. But those around him might be interested in quote, self-preservation. The official said the U.S. is gathering intelligence that could both inform U.S. policy, and be used in future war-crimes trials.

Secretary Clinton says the U.S. has also been reaching out to Libyans who are attempting to organize in the east of the country.

Secretary CLINTON: The people of Libya have made themselves clear. It is time for Gadhafi to go now, without further violence or delay.

KELEMEN: Though Libya tops her agenda, Secretary Clinton says change is sweeping through the region, and every country is dealing with it differently. She praised the kings of Jordan and Bahrain, both U.S. allies, for what she described as meaningful outreach to protesters.

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