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Moms Debate 'Zero Tolerance' Rules In High Schools
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Moms Debate 'Zero Tolerance' Rules In High Schools

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Moms Debate 'Zero Tolerance' Rules In High Schools

Moms Debate 'Zero Tolerance' Rules In High Schools
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The recent suicide of a student in suburban Washington, D.C., after being suspended from school has sparked a fierce debate on disciplinary policies.

Angry parents say "zero tolerance" rules are too harsh on kids. And a recent report by a Philadelphia youth advocacy group says "zero tolerance" policies are particularly harmful to minority students.

But administrators and teachers argue that strict rules are necessary to keep students safe.

In Tell Me More's weekly parenting conversation, host Michel Martin discusses the issue with regular moms contributor Dani Tucker, Washington Post columnist Petula Dvorak and child psychiatrist Jenna Saul.

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