Mostarda Di Frutta

Mostarda di Frutta is a sort of sweet fruit relish from Italy — a chutney, if you will. Although the word mostarda does derive from mustard seed, the connection is indirect because the original name referred to "fiery must" which was grape must cooked with mustard seed. At any rate, this condiment is traditionally served on boiled meats, white meats and sometimes dried sausages and cheese. It will keep for up to 10 days in the refrigerator.

Mostarda Di Frutta
Kevin D. Weeks for NPR

Makes 2 cups

2 navel oranges

1 large lemon

2/3 cup honey

2/3 cup sugar

1/2 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 fresh rosemary sprig

1 1/2 tablespoons dry mustard

1 teaspoons mustard seeds

1 tablespoon dry vermouth

Wash fruit thoroughly.

Trim 1/2 inch from each end of the orange, exposing the flesh. Then score, top to bottom, just through the skin and pith to the fruit at 1/4-inch intervals. Peel skin and pith from flesh (reserving fruit for another use). Repeat with lemon. Cut strips of peel in half-inch lengths.

Bring 3 cups of water to a boil, add peels, return to a boil and cook 1 minute. Drain into a fine-mesh sieve and run under cold water to cool. Pat dry with paper towel.

Bring honey and 1/4 cup water to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Add peels and reduce to a simmer. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 50 minutes until peels are semi-translucent and liquid is reduced to about 1/4 cup.

Drain peels in a sieve, reserving liquid. Spread peels on a sheet of parchment or foil and cool.

Combine 1/2 cup cold water, sugar and lemon juice in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is clear and slightly reduced. Add rosemary, remove from heat, cool for 15 minutes then discard rosemary. Stir in honey mixture.

Whisk together vermouth, dry mustard and mustard seed in a very small saucepan and cook until mixture is thick and smooth — stirring constantly — about 2 minutes. Whisk into syrup mixture.

Put peels in a 2-cup, heat-proof lidded jar. Pour in syrup (discarding any not needed). Seal jar and refrigerate for at least 6 hours and up to 10 days.

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