Study: More Young People Scorn Sex A new federal survey found that 27 percent of young men and 29 percent of young women ages 15 to 24 say they've never had a sexual encounter. In 2002, 22 percent of both men and women said they had never had any sort of sex.
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Study: More Young People Scorn Sex

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Study: More Young People Scorn Sex

Study: More Young People Scorn Sex

Study: More Young People Scorn Sex

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A new federal survey found that 27 percent of young men and 29 percent of young women ages 15 to 24 say they've never had a sexual encounter. In 2002, 22 percent of both men and women said they had never had any sort of sex.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's not quite a revolution, but it is a significant change for teenagers in this country. More and more teens appear to be postponing sexual activity. NPR's Nancy Shute reports.

NANCY SHUTE: Experts aren't sure if this is a trend, but teen pregnancy rates are down and use of condoms and birth control is up. Pediatrician John Santelli is a senior fellow at the Guttmacher Institute which studies sexual health.

JOHN SANTELLI: You know, I see a generation of adolescence who are very concerned about making the right life choices, you know, trying to take care of their health, trying to take care of their responsibilities in school and perhaps this kind of data reflects that. It's hard to know.

SHUTE: Nancy Shute, NPR News, Washington.

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