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Fixture On Opinion Pages, David Broder Dies At 81

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Fixture On Opinion Pages, David Broder Dies At 81

Remembrances

Fixture On Opinion Pages, David Broder Dies At 81

Fixture On Opinion Pages, David Broder Dies At 81

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David Broder, a Pulitzer-Prize winning columnist for The Washington Post, died Wednesday at the age of 81. Broder was a fixture on opinion pages and TV news shows. But he made his name with shoe-leather reporting.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

Let's take a moment, now, to remember David Broder. He's the Washington Post columnist who died yesterday at age 81. Broder was a fixture on opinion pages and TV news shows. But he made his name with shoe-leather reporting. When covering political campaigns, Broder would simply knock on the doors of voters in key districts.

(Soundbite of Broder interview)

Mr. DAVID BRODER TAPE (The Washington Post): It's easier as you get older because I think a lot of people must feel sorry for me. I mean, they say, look at this poor old man, at his age having to go knock on doors. You know, and sometimes the weather's nasty, so they'll invite you in for a cup of tea or something like that.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And over tea, thousands of people told Broder what was on their minds, from neighborhood crime to foreign policy. He often told readers, and viewers, and listeners what he thought. But David Broder listened, and he shared what he learned.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: This is Morning Edition from NPR News.

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