Dam Mantle: Triumph In Cacophony A jittery drum machine sets off Dam Mantle's "Movement," a tastefully cheesy marriage of clicking beats and airy melodies that blooms into a rich electronic instrumental.
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First Wave

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Dam Mantle: Triumph In Cacophony

Review

Dam Mantle: Triumph In Cacophony

First Wave

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Dam Mantle's "Movement" marries clicking beats and airy melodies before blooming into a rich instrumental. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Dam Mantle's "Movement" marries clicking beats and airy melodies before blooming into a rich instrumental.

Courtesy of the artist

Tuesday's Pick

Song: "Movement"

Artist: Dam Mantle

CD: First Wave

Genre: Electronic

Every day this week, Song of the Day will showcase a track by an artist playing the South by Southwest music festival. For NPR Music's full coverage of SXSW — complete with full-length concerts, studio sessions, blogs, Twitter feeds, video and more — click here. And don't miss our continuous 100-song playlist, The Austin 100, which features much more of the best music the festival has to offer.

Glaswegian musician Tom Marshall began his career as a folk artist, but now he crafts adrenaline-infused electronic music under the name Dam Mantle, a moniker and project he established in late 2009.

A jittery drum machine sets off "Movement," a tastefully cheesy marriage of clicking beats and airy melodies that blooms into a rich electronic instrumental. A couple minutes in, cymbals come crashing in like waves of synth-based soup. It's rich and hopeful throughout, but as the track wraps, the real celebration comes in: Euphoric electronics bounce around as whirring whistles scream out and the crashes grow in frequency. At nearly six minutes, by the time fists fly in the air, it's easy to revel in the release.