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Happy Birthday Twitter!

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Happy Birthday Twitter!

Business

Happy Birthday Twitter!

Happy Birthday Twitter!

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The Internet messaging service Twitter turns five years old on Monday. Now more than 200 million people around the world use Twitter.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

All right. One of the quickest ways to communicate between the Midwest and Japan or anywhere else for that matter, is Twitter. The Internet messaging service turns five years old today.

So our last word in business is inviting co-workers. That was the world's very first tweet - inviting co-workers. Twitter's co-founder Jack Dorsey launched a service intended to provide short status updates. Messages are limited to 140 characters, usually a sentence or two. Now more than 200 million people around the world use Twitter to follow everything from the Arab uprisings, to the earthquake in Japan, to their friends' latest movements, and witty remarks, baiting habits, anything at all.

You can follow us @MORNINGEDITION or @nprinskeep. It's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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