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Lady May Be World's Oldest Osprey

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Lady May Be World's Oldest Osprey

Animals

Lady May Be World's Oldest Osprey

Lady May Be World's Oldest Osprey

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Lady is not just any old bird. She's perhaps the oldest osprey in the world. After traveling 6,000 miles, she's completed her 21st migration from Africa back to Scotland. These wide-winged birds of prey nearly went extinct and are still quite rare.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Lady is not just any old bird. She's perhaps the oldest osprey in the world. And after traveling 6,000 miles, she's completed her 21st migration from Africa back to Scotland. Last year, a webcam trained on this wide-winged bird of prey captivated viewers around the world when she suddenly stopped eating and almost died. Now Lady's back in her nest the size of a double bed and waiting her mate.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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