Japan And Haiti: Picturing The Unimaginable

Photojournalists travel the world, using their cameras to tell stories about how we live and who we are. Their tales are often of war, famine or disease; sometimes, of triumph and joy. The disasters in Haiti one year ago and now in Japan challenge even the best photojournalists to compose a shot that helps us get a sense of the horrific scale of destruction that nature has visited upon both countries. NPR photographer David Gilkey takes us on a tour of these forbidden landscapes and the people who are left to inhabit them. Though their respective tragedies are half a world apart, the stories these pictures tell of destruction and loss are eerily similar.

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Japan And Haiti: Picturing The Unimaginable

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