IKEA Ads Portray Clutter As Battle Of The Sexes

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IKEA's ad agency claims that clutter and household messes are among the most common causes of fights in the home. So the world's biggest furniture retailer is trying to stoke an age-old war between the sexes in order to sell its storage products. Its provocative new marketing campaign in Great Britain has punch lines like "the only thing a woman will ever clear out is your bank account," and "the only thing a man will clear out is his Internet history."

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business news today comes from IKEA.

The world's biggest furniture retailer is trying to stoke an age-old war between the sexes in order to sell its storage products.

(Soundbite of ad)

Unidentified Man #1: If someone asked you is messier, men or women, who would you say? The girls, isn't guys?

Unidentified Men: Yeah!

MONTAGNE: The company has just launched a provocative new ad campaign in Great Britain.

(Soundbite of ad)

Unidentified Man #1: The only thing a woman will ever clear out is your bank account.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Unidentified Woman: The only thing a man will ever clear out is his Internet history.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MONTAGNE: IKEA's ad agency claims that clutter and household mess are one of the most common causes of fights in the home, so buy our closets and shelving and you'll have a more peaceful home life. That's the message the agency and the company hope consumers will buy as well.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

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