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Wis. Gov. Takes Heat Over Lobbyist's Son's Job

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Wis. Gov. Takes Heat Over Lobbyist's Son's Job

Wis. Gov. Takes Heat Over Lobbyist's Son's Job

Wis. Gov. Takes Heat Over Lobbyist's Son's Job

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135135540/135135514" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Renee Montagne has the latest news on Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And now a final word from Wisconsin, where Republican Governor Scott Walker made headlines earlier this year by squeezing labor unions. The governor said public employees are overcompensated. Now the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is reporting the governor doesn't mind compensating the 27-year-old son of a big campaign donor - $81,500 a year. That is the annual salary for his job at the state commerce department. The state of Wisconsin's new hire has no college degree, little management experience, and two arrests for drunk driving.

His father, who's a longtime lobbyist for the Wisconsin Builders Association and a campaign backer of Governor Walker, told the paper he'd put in a good word for his son with the governor's campaign manager last year, but he insists that his son got the job all on his own.

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MONTAGNE: You're listening to MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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