NPR logo

Customers' Emails Exposed In Epsilon Security Breach

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135135556/135135520" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Customers' Emails Exposed In Epsilon Security Breach

Business

Customers' Emails Exposed In Epsilon Security Breach

Customers' Emails Exposed In Epsilon Security Breach

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135135556/135135520" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The online marketer Epsilon has told major companies that it inadvertently exposed tens of millions of their customers' names and emails in a giant security breach that could leave them vulnerable to phishing attacks. The marketer works with big banks, retailers and hotel chains.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with a giant security breach.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: Tens of millions of people could be vulnerable to email scams. An online marketer has told major companies that it inadvertently exposed customers' names and emails.

The marketer is called Epsilon. It says only names and emails were revealed, but that is all a scammer needs to launch what are called phishing attacks. Those are emails that look like they're from trusted companies, but aim to lure people into revealing sensitive information. You get an email saying there's a problem with your bank account. Please send us your Social Security number.

Epsilon's customers are big banks, retailers and hotel chains.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.