Your Letters: Loose Cobra; Full Gas Tanks

Last Saturday, host Scott Simon talked about the 2-foot-long Egyptian cobra that disappeared from the Bronx Zoo, only to be discovered in a dark corner of the reptile house. Also, we found out why a car's gas gauge stays on full long after it leaves the gas station. Host Scott Simon reads listeners' e-mails and comments.

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

Time now for your letters.

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Let's begin with a few responses to my essay last Saturday of the two-foot-long Egyptian cobra that disappeared from the Bronx Zoo only to be discovered in a dark corner of the reptile house. I suggested the story became so popular because it's beguiling to imagine what it would be like to be able to slip through the streets of New York, seeing and hearing all without being seen.

Ashley Smith says on our website: Thank you for reminding me to head into the day with eyes wide open, striving to look at everything as hard as I can, because the world is too wonderful to fully take in.

Meg McSweeney(ph) of Washington Cross in Pennsylvania says on Twitter: From Bronx Zoo cobra to Emily in "Our Town," the ridiculous can illuminate the sublime.

And Robert Sheppy(ph) writes: Turn it loose in Congress.

Last Saturday, we also spoke with Ford engineer Phil Pierron about why a car's gas gauge stays on full long after it leaves the gas station. Jess Milika Kenroga(ph) says: I always wondered why my gas stuck high up top for a while and then plummeted. Whatever. Just keeps my mood up for a day or two before I start thinking about having to gas up again.

Now, last week NPR's Mike Pesca said...

MIKE PESCA: John Calipari, the coach of the Kentucky Wildcats, has been to the Final Four twice. Although if you look at the official records they don't reflect that because both of those appearances were vacated when in the case of UMass Marcus Camby was shown to take money. In the case of Memphis Derrick Rose maybe got an assist with his SATs or his ACTs.

SIMON: Bob Olivan(ph) writes: Finally, a correspondent who correctly notes that Calipari has had two full seasons wiped out due to recruiting violations. Mike Pesca is likely to be reviled by Kentucky fans, but there is no denying Calipari has one of the lowest graduation rates of any Division 1 coach and got caught cheating twice.

Last Saturday, we talked with Linda Eder about her new CD titled, "Now." She's got a voice that's been compared to the greats.

Ms. LINDA EDER (Singer): Fans will come up to me and say, oh, you're better than Barbara Streisand. The polite Linda will look at them and say, oh, thank you very much. But inside I'm thinking you're an idiot. You don't know what you're talking about. She's the best there is at what she does.

SIMON: Bill Beach of Edgewater, Florida writes: As to Linda Eder and her false modesty, you and I both know she sounds like Barbara Streisand would like to sound.

We welcome your comments. Go to NPR.org, click on the contact us link. You can also post a comment on Facebook or Twitter at NPRWeekend. You can send me a tweet at NPRScottSimon.

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Ms. EDER: (Singing) It's gone, move on.

SIMON: This is NPR News.

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