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Higher Gas Prices Make Electric Cars More Attractive

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Higher Gas Prices Make Electric Cars More Attractive

Business

Higher Gas Prices Make Electric Cars More Attractive

Higher Gas Prices Make Electric Cars More Attractive

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135533880/135533915" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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According to a new study, if gas hits $5 a gallon, most Americans would consider buying an electric vehicle. And gas is headed in that direction — it's already averaging more than $4 a gallon in several states.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

And our last word in business is tipping point.

According to a new study, if gas hits five dollars a gallon, most Americans would consider buying an electric vehicle. And gas is headed in that direction - it's already averaging more than four bucks a gallon in several states now.

The business consulting firm, Deloitte, interviewed more than a thousand Americans. Seventy-eight percent say they would think about purchasing an electric car if gas hits that level. But here's the rub, most say they don't want to pay a premium, and electric cars are still significantly more expensive than conventional ones.

Thats the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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