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Tennis On World Cafe

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Tennis On World Cafe

Tennis On World Cafe

Tennis On World Cafe

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Denver's Tennis recently performed their breezy, '60s pop on World Cafe. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the artist

Denver's Tennis recently performed their breezy, '60s pop on World Cafe.

Courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "Marathon"
  • "Pigeon"
  • "South Carolina"

Denver couple Patrick Riley and Alaina Moore sold most of their possessions, bought a sailboat and spent much of the next year traversing the Atlantic Ocean. Though their story sounds as though it was plucked from one of our winter fantasies, the husband-and-wife duo had been carefully planning the voyage ever since they met in college. But what they didn't foresee was that the trip would rekindle their love of music and fuel their careers in the indie-rock band Tennis.

Both Riley and Moore had been musicians in various unsuccessful bands throughout the years, but had since stowed away their instruments in dusty closets. As their seven-month voyage carried them 2,500 miles across the Atlantic, they found joy in the simplicity of their unregulated lifestyle. "I think we had both put our music equipment away pretty much forever, thinking we would never approach playing music as a lifestyle again until we went sailing," says Riley.

Hear the band perform songs from its debut and talk with World Cafe host David Dye about how the couple met, the open seas and Tennis' new album, Cape Dory.

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