Kindle Users Will Be Able To Borrow From Libraries

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Amazon.com announced it will start allowing owners of its Kindle e-reader to borrow e-books from libraries across the country. Many public libraries have websites and card holders may download e-books for set periods of time.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

Our last word in business today: digital bookworm.

Yesterday, Amazon.com said it will start allowing owners of its Kindle e-reader to borrow e-books from libraries across the country. Many public libraries now have websites, and cardholders can download e-books for set periods of time. Amazon is actually just catching up with Sony and Barnes & Noble, who have allowed free library books onto their e-readers for a while now.

But Amazon's move is a big one, given the number of Kindle users, and publishers are uneasy. For one, more digital lending means fewer book sales to libraries. And e-books don't get all dog-eared, so they don't need to be replaced as often.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

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