Business

Remembering The Father Of The Compact Disc

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Former Sony President Norio Ohga died over the weekend at the age of 81. Ohga was the head of Sony when the company introduced the compact disc to the world. That was three decades ago, when people listened to music on LPs and cassette tapes. Ohga believed CDs had better sound quality.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business goes out to the father of the CD - former Sony president Norio Ohga, who died over the weekend at the age of 81.

Ohga was the head of Sony when the company introduced the compact disc to the world - three decades ago, when people listened to music on LPs and cassette tapes. Ohga believed that CDs had better sound quality, and he knew what he was talking about.

In addition to being one of Japan's most important business leaders, he was also a baritone opera singer who occasionally conducted the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra.

And when Sony was developing the CD, Ohga insisted that it store 75 minutes of audio because he wanted to be able to hear all of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony without interruption.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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