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Geologists Rush To The Hills To Look For More Gold

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Geologists Rush To The Hills To Look For More Gold

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Geologists Rush To The Hills To Look For More Gold

Geologists Rush To The Hills To Look For More Gold

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A mini gold rush could be coming back to California's Sierra Nevada mountains. A landowner has found what is believed to be the biggest nugget of gold found in the region. It sold for $460,000 at auction.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Could be a new gold rush in California. This might be a little different than in the 1840s and '50s, when thousands of men overran gold fields in California. But about 60 miles north of John Sutter's mill, where the gold rush began in 1848, a landowner with a metal detector hit the motherload one year ago. He found an 8.2-pound gold nugget. He took it to the office of geologist Fred Halobird, and Halobird knew he was looking at something extraordinary.

Mr. FRED HALOBIRD (Geologist): You'd like to see the stuff that is, you know -that books are written about. And that nugget is just that. It's one of these once-in-a-lifetime treasures that you hope to see in a museum. And not only did I not see it in a museum, it walked into my office. So I got to handle it upfront, close, personal. It's just very, very exciting.

INSKEEP: Mr. Halobird helped to auction off what is believed to be the largest piece of gold ever found in the area, for $460,000.

The owner is keeping the location secret for fear of modern-day claim jumpers.

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