'Terminal Connections:' Kreuzberg's Play2C Theater Premieres Six Short Plays This May, Kreuzberg's Play2C is premiering "Terminal Connections," a string of six short plays set in airports transit lounges, departure and arrival halls around the world. The cast and crew of the show itself resembles an airport lounge, made up of 16 nationalities.
NPR logo

'Terminal Connections:' Kreuzberg's Play2C Theater Premieres Six Short Plays

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135541053/135540925" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
'Terminal Connections:' Kreuzberg's Play2C Theater Premieres Six Short Plays

'Terminal Connections:' Kreuzberg's Play2C Theater Premieres Six Short Plays

'Terminal Connections:' Kreuzberg's Play2C Theater Premieres Six Short Plays

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135541053/135540925" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Actors Attila Oener and Katina Mitchell perform in the upcoming show "Terminal Connections" at Play2C, located at Schlesische Str. 38, 10997 Berlin-Kreuzberg. Christian Doppelgatz hide caption

toggle caption
Christian Doppelgatz

Actors Attila Oener and Katina Mitchell perform in the upcoming show "Terminal Connections" at Play2C, located at Schlesische Str. 38, 10997 Berlin-Kreuzberg.

Christian Doppelgatz

An American woman begins a tense conversation with a man from the Middle East, whom she believes may be a terrorist, but then their conversation takes a surprising turn: both are travelers sitting in an airport waiting room.

"Terminal Connections" is a string of six short plays, set in airports around the world in transit lounges, departure and arrival halls.

The scripts were written at workshops held at the HB Playwrights Foundation in New York City.

This May, the short stories about airport encounters will be staged at Play2C Theater Studio in Kreuzberg.

Attila Oener plays the character Assis, a traveler from the Middle East. Oener says she was attracted to the role of Assis partly because it was an opportunity to act in English.

"Normally I play in German or in Turkish, and I like the role very much because I have an accent, and Assis has an accent."

The cast and crew of "Terminal Connections" itself resembles an airport lounge, made up of 16 nationalities.

Californian Katina Mitchell plays Attila's counterpart and says some of themes in the play hit close to home.

"Terrorism is never exclusively mentioned in the short play, but it's definitely a theme which many people can connect with, especially after the threats here in Berlin recently. I mean, around Christmas time everybody was even afraid to take the train," Mitchell says.

One of the few Germans involved in theater production is Ali von Stein, the artistic director of Play2C. Von Stein worked for many years as a director and actor in New York before returning to Germany.

He says the airport stories touch upon our own personal fears.

"In life, when you are afraid, the impulse is to shrink and to reduce yourself - in space physically and psychologically. You also take yourself to a minimum space, and life just goes on and you simply cease to participate. The only way to overcome fear is to look at it - to look at it's eye. Look in it's eye," von Stein says.

"Terminal Connections" is the third production from Ali von Stein and his partner Krisana Locke in Berlin. They built their theater studio in a former flour mill in Kreuzberg with the goal of establishing a new international performing arts space.

"We wanted to collaborate with artists from all over the world, and Berlin is such a hub at the moment. We caught the vibe, we caught the buzz, and we have many more things than theater going on. We have acting classes, yoga classes and dance events," von Stein says.

For "Terminal Connections," the 240 square meter studio will be turned into an interactive lounge. Images of airports will be projected onto giant screens. Rather than using stage hands, the cast will double as passengers and airport workers, changing sets between plays.

The crew promise it won't just be a serious drama about fear; elements of cabaret will pop up, including a larger-than-life pilot.