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Facebook Joins Crowded Online Coupon Field

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Facebook Joins Crowded Online Coupon Field

Business

Facebook Joins Crowded Online Coupon Field

Facebook Joins Crowded Online Coupon Field

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Facebook announced Tuesday it is jumping into the online coupon field already occupied by Groupon, LivingSocial and many others. Facebook will only offer social deals – things you wouldn't normally do alone like river rafting.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Facebook is joining the crowded online coupon field. Yesterday, the company began offering users in five cities discounts for everything from wine tastings to concert tickets.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

SONARI GLINTON: There's Groupon, Living Social, OpenTable, Google Offers, now Facebook. How are Facebook's Internet coupons different? They only offer social deals.

Ms. EMILY WHITE (Facebook): So they're deals that you would never really do alone, like river rafting or going to a Rihanna concert.

GLINTON: Emily White with Facebook says the company will be better positioned than others to target groups.

Ms. WHITE: With over 500 million users, we have a really large audience that we know a lot about, because they've chosen to share a lot about themselves with us.

GLINTON: Mario Correa runs TheDailyHookup.com, a deal website aimed at gay men. He says as more giant sites like Facebook enter the coupon fray, the better it'll be for niche marketers.

Mr. MARIO CORREA (CEO, TheDailyHookup.com): Your deals are getting to become lowest-common-denominator deals, you know, stuff that is just really not very interesting, but gets the most people potentially involved because it's cheap and it's easy.

GLINTON: Correa says there's room for a lot of competition, because everyone likes a deal.

Sonari Glinton, NPR News.

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