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Letters: Devastating Tornadoes; Royal Wedding
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Letters: Devastating Tornadoes; Royal Wedding

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Letters: Devastating Tornadoes; Royal Wedding

Letters: Devastating Tornadoes; Royal Wedding
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  • Transcript

Michele Norris and Melissa Block read from listener comments and run a correction.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Time now for your comments and a correction. Yesterday, I spoke with New Yorker editor David Remnick about President Obama's decision to release his long form birth certificate this week. In introducing the discussion, I misspoke saying that some are still not convinced the president is a naturalized citizen. What I meant to say is that though Mr. Obama was born in the U.S., some are still not convinced the president is a native-born citizen.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Following this week's devastating tornadoes, we spoke with Reginald Eppes. He's a fireman outside of Tuscaloosa, Alabama. His oldest son was sucked out of their house by a tornado but then walked back home relatively unharmed after the storm.

Mr. REGINALD EPPES (Fireman): I was in the E.R., the nurses come back in the room and they said, you have a wonderful kid. I said, well, what happened? I said I know he's great. She said, well, he was telling us what happened. He said he went up, and he said he just floated back down to the ground. He said, I saw the light, those flashlights that I had early in my hands, that he saw the beams of those lights. And he walked back to them. That's how he found us.

BLOCK: Well, Mr. Eppes' story moved many listeners, including Bob Perkins of Seattle. He writes this: Wow. When the detritus hits the fan, I want Reginald Eppes on my team. His calm, his resilience, his faith, his humility, his love for his family shone like a golden light through my car radio on Interstate 5 yesterday.

NORRIS: Finally, kudos for our coverage yesterday of the royal wedding, rather for the music we used to follow that coverage. Jeff Lariviere of Westfield, Massachusetts, writes: An instrumental version of "White Wedding" at the bottom of the royal wedding story? You cheeky little monkeys. Cheers.

(Soundbite of song, "White Wedding")

BLOCK: And please keep your letters coming. Go to our website and click on Contact Us at the bottom of the page.

(Soundbite of song, "White Wedding")

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