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Japan Temporarily Closes Hamaoka Nuclear Plant
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Japan Temporarily Closes Hamaoka Nuclear Plant

Business

Japan Temporarily Closes Hamaoka Nuclear Plant

Japan Temporarily Closes Hamaoka Nuclear Plant
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Executives at a nuclear plant west of Tokyo say they will shut down the facility's three reactors. The Japanese government requested the closure. It's been surveying the country's 50 or so reactors, following the Fukushima disaster, to determine their vulnerability to earthquakes and tsunamis.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's business news starts with Japan closing a nuclear power plant.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: Executives at a nuclear plant west of Tokyo say they will shut down the facility's three reactors. The Japanese government had requested the closure. It's been surveying the country's 50 or so reactors in the wake of the Fukushima disaster to determine their vulnerability to earthquakes and tsunamis.

The aging Hamaoka nuclear power plant is considered one of Japan's most dangerous. It's located in an area where a major earthquake is expected in the next three decades. The plant provides power to central Japan. That's where many Toyota factories are located. So today's move is a blow to the carmaker, as well.

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