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Your Letters: Facebook Reunions; 'Cod And Country'

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Your Letters: Facebook Reunions; 'Cod And Country'

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Your Letters: Facebook Reunions; 'Cod And Country'

Your Letters: Facebook Reunions; 'Cod And Country'

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Last Sunday, we brought you a story about an increasing number of people who are skipping their class reunions in favor of keeping up with former classmates on Facebook. We also spoke with Chef Barton Seaver about his new cookbook, For Cod and Country. Host Liane Hansen reads listener's e-mails and Web comments.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Now to your comments.

Last Sunday, we brought you a story about an increasing number of people who are skipping their class reunions in favor of keeping up with former classmates on Facebook. After hearing it, Carol Herschleb of Nevada City, California, wrote us to say: What could be more enjoyable, more meaningful, more human than seeing your friends in person, read their faces, listen to their voices and inflections, catch up on news, have an argument, share a meal - all things that you can do at a class reunion in person.

But Linda Ferris, who was among the many who posted comments on our website, writes: There was a real good reason why I left the area where I graduated from high school. I know not much has changed. Facebook is fine with me. I'm connected via email and phone with those who mean anything to me, thank you very much.

Last week, we spoke with Chef Barton Seaver about his new cookbook, "For Cod and Country." It's focused on sustainable seafood. During our conversation, Seaver said farm-raised fish can be an ocean-friendly substitute.

Chuck Thompson, a salmon fisherman, writes on NPR.org: Seaver's remark that farmed fish could be part of a solution is somewhat true but is limited to very select niches of the seafood industry. Farmed-raised catfish, shellfish and tilapia are usually raised in controlled environments that have little adverse effect on the ecosystem, unlike, say, Chilean sea bass or salmon farms.

We want to hear from you. Go to NPR.org, and click on the Contact Us link. You can also post a comment on Facebook and Twitter, both at NPRWeekend.

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