NPR logo

Review: 'Miss New India'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136723353/136723339" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Review: 'Miss New India'

Books

Review: 'Miss New India'

Review: 'Miss New India'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136723353/136723339" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Novelist Bharati Mukherjee offers a view of modern India in her new novel Miss New India.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Michele Norris.

W: "Miss New India."] Our reviewer Alan Cheuse says it offers an image of India both classic and contemporary.

ALAN CHEUSE: A village girl goes to the big city, throwing off the old ways and discovering her new identity. We've seen that plot at work here in our own fiction - I'm thinking of Dreiser's classic novel "Sister Carrie," which stripped away all pretence about the values of the new industrial city, as opposed to the old pastoral life of pre-Civil War America.

W: All of her call center friends work hard to sound American. Novelist Mukherjee doesn't have to do that. She's made a thoroughly American novel about her former nation that proves with serious dramatic verve and passion that going home again may be difficult for any of us.

NORRIS: "Miss New India" is the new book by Bharati Mukherjee. Our reviewer, Alan Cheuse, teaches writing at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.