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New Rules For Vietnamese Police

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New Rules For Vietnamese Police

New Rules For Vietnamese Police

New Rules For Vietnamese Police

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New Rules For Vietnamese Police

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New Rules For Vietnamese Police

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New Rules For Vietnamese Police

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In Vietnam, black sunglasses are now banned for its police officers, along with smoking and chatting on the job. And traffic cops have been order to stop hiding behind trees to catch errant drivers. Vietnamese officials hope the changes will improve the police force's notoriously bad reputation.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Here in the U.S., aviator sunglasses might as well be part of the official state trooper uniform. In Vietnam, black sunglasses are now banned for its police officers, along with smoking and chatting on the job. And traffic cops have been ordered to stop hiding behind trees to catch errant drivers - a rule that would make some American motorists happy. Vietnamese officials hope the changes will improve the police force's notoriously bad reputation.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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