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Summer Sounds: Little League

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Summer Sounds: Little League

Sports

Summer Sounds: Little League

Summer Sounds: Little League

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Steve Proffitt is sure it's summer when he hears the sound of a Little League game. This was underlined not long ago when he took a ball to the chin when his son was playing.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

This week, we've begun a series called Summer Sounds. We've asked people to share sounds with us that for them aren't just a part of summer, they are summer.

STEVE PROFFITT: This is Steve Proffitt. I'm a producer for "The Madeleine Brand Show" at member station KPCC in Los Angeles.

I love Little League, even though a couple of days ago I took a ball in the chin. I was throwing batting practice and a pitch sprang off the end of the bat. I didn't even see it coming. I guess I'm just too old and too slow. But at the ballpark I forget that sitting in the dugout, hitting hot grounders to the infielders, watching a kid chase and catch a long drive way out to the fence.

After taking it on the chin, I decided to retire as a batting practice pitcher. But even though my lip was black for weeks, I love it out here because for just a little while during every game, I forget that I'm old and bald and a little saggy. And for a few moments, I really do remember what it feels like to be 12, with a whole summer ahead of me.

NORRIS: A summer sound from producer Steve Proffitt of member station KPCC in Pasadena, California. You can share your Summer Sounds at NPR.org. Please put Summer Sounds in the subject line.

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