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Letters: Kurt Vonnegut; Hamza al-Khateeb

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Letters: Kurt Vonnegut; Hamza al-Khateeb

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Letters: Kurt Vonnegut; Hamza al-Khateeb

Letters: Kurt Vonnegut; Hamza al-Khateeb

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Robert Siegel and Michele Norris read letters from listeners.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

And I'm Michele Norris.

And it's time now for your letters and one correction. Today, the Library of America is republishing four of Kurt Vonnegut's best-known novels. Earlier this week, we aired a story about Vonnegut's view of war and his personal experience having lived through the fire-bombing of Dresden.

We said that more than 100,000 people died in that bombing but some listeners claimed that number missed the mark.

SIEGEL: So, we double-checked it and indeed, the estimates of those killed in Dresden vary wildly depending on the source. The city of Dresden actually commissioned its own study and released its findings back in 2008. And according to the city, the true death toll ranges between 18 and 25,000.

NORRIS: Now to your letters. We heard a story about Hamza al-Khateeb. The 13-year-old Syrian boy was brutally killed either during or soon after and anti-government protest, presumably by security forces. Gruesome video of his body has infuriated and galvanized Syrian protesters.

SIEGEL: Aretha Sweda(ph) of Ellicott City, Maryland, says the story reminded her of Emmitt Till. And she writes this: coverage about the brutal slayings of these young men, one 14 years old, the other 13 years old; one in Jet magazine in 1955, and the other on YouTube in 2011; both became rallying cries for human rights.

NORRIS: On a much lighter note, we talked to ESPN's Scott Burnside about the impending move of the NHL's Atlanta Thrashers to Winnipeg. The Thrashers were part of the league's expansion into the South in the 1990s. This included a move of the Hartford Whalers to North Carolina.

Well, Whaler fan Steve Scolo(ph) of New Orleans says this effort wasn't in every case expansion. He writes: to be clear, expansion occurs when something grows, not when the heart of one community is transplanted into the tobacco fields of another. Please note, however, that I do find joy for Winnipeg.

SIEGEL: Keep your letters coming. You can write to us by visiting NPR.org. Just click on Contact Us.

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