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Letters: Finding A Job And Meaningful Travel

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Letters: Finding A Job And Meaningful Travel

From Our Listeners

Letters: Finding A Job And Meaningful Travel

Letters: Finding A Job And Meaningful Travel

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Host Neal Conan reads from listener comments on previous Talk of the Nation shows, including finding employment in this tough economy, how to make travel meaningful and what not to say to someone who's very sick.

NEAL CONAN, host: We didn't get to your letters yesterday, so now it's time to read from your comments.

Our conversation about the economic recovery and how that's playing out where you live drew a lot of stories. Ahmad Khan(ph) from Detroit wrote: I am 28 years old and I lost my job two years ago. At first, I was shocked because I thought I would always have a job. The same day I lost my job, I decided I would never wait for anyone to give me a job. Today, I'm listening to your program from the office of my new software company. I wish people could see that you don't have to wait for anyone to give you a job, but rather that you make your own and to find yourself.

Writer Bruce Feiler shared some phrases he thinks he should never say to someone seriously ill. You weighed in with some of your own. Linda Friar(ph) from Arkansas sent this email: I have not been seriously ill, but cared for my mother, who was. My thing not to say is, I know how you feel. Do you? Is your mom going to die and there's nothing you can do? Also, don't forget the caregiver, please don't forget the caregiver. Just because they are there are doesn't mean that they don't need help, visits or prayer.

From road trips to travels abroad, our conversations about meaningful travel with Pico Ayer and Paul Theroux prompted Kim Webb Palacios to write from San Ramon, California: My most rewarding travel experience as an African-American was to visit Africa for the first time. I visited Tanzania and stayed in a small village in the foothills of Kilimanjaro before climbing the mountain and venturing off to see the rest of the country. I loved that everybody looked like me. I kept saying excitedly to my husband, look, everyone here is black. The obviousness of my observation did not dampen my joy. It was literally the first time I had ever experience such a thing.

If you have a correction, comments or questions for us, the best way to reach us is by email. The address is talk@npr.org. Please let us know where you're writing from and give us some help on how to pronounce your name. If you want to find out what's coming up on the show everyday, sign up for our email newsletter. You can do that at npr.org, click on TALK OF THE NATION and scroll down to the newsletter sign-up box. If you're on Twitter, you can follow us there, @TOTN, or you can follow me, @nealconan, all one word.

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