NPR logo

CNN Sportscaster Nick Charles Dies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137429481/137429461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
CNN Sportscaster Nick Charles Dies

Media

CNN Sportscaster Nick Charles Dies

CNN Sportscaster Nick Charles Dies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137429481/137429461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nick Charles, a one-time Washington sportscaster who became CNN's first sports anchor in 1980, has died of bladder cancer. Guest host Susan Stamberg has this remembrance.

SUSAN STAMBERG, host:

Nick Charles, CNN's first sports anchor, died yesterday of bladder cancer. He was 64. Charles, who was once a taxi driver, started working at the cable news network on its first day, back in 1980. Recalling those early years, he said when I came back to work each Monday, I wasn't sure if the station would still be there or if it would be a dry cleaning store.

Nick Charles co-anchored the CNN show "Sports Night" for 17 years, then created his own sports show. Boxing was his specialty, but he also covered the Winter Olympics, Super Bowls, the Kentucky Derby and the Wimbledon tennis tournament.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.