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Japan's Vending Industry Must Reduce Power Use

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Japan's Vending Industry Must Reduce Power Use

Business

Japan's Vending Industry Must Reduce Power Use

Japan's Vending Industry Must Reduce Power Use

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Vending machine operators in Japan are under pressure to reduce their energy use after this year's earthquake wrecked a nuclear plant. A Japanese newspaper says vending operators are dispatching workers to switch off the refrigeration in the machines for set periods of time.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Now, after the Japanese earthquake, you can still get a soft drink - so long as you don't mind it warm.

Japan is famous for its extensive use of vending machines, which sell everything from cold drinks to hot drinks to French fries and beer. Those machines use a lot of electricity and vending machines operators are under pressure to reduce their energy use after this year's earthquake wrecked a nuclear plant. A Japanese newspaper says vending operators are dispatching workers to switch off the refrigeration in machines for set periods of time.

So we were going to say that our last word in business is room temperature, but the vendors claim the machines are well insulated and that only sensitive people will notice the change.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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