Debate Boils Over African-American Abortions

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An anti-abortion billboard with President Barack Obama's image is shown by a vacant lot in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago's South Side Saturday, April 23, 2011. The billboard is from a Texas anti-abortion group, not the Radiance Foundation, whose co-founder appeared in this interview with NPR. i

An anti-abortion billboard with President Barack Obama's image is shown by a vacant lot in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago's South Side Saturday, April 23, 2011. The billboard is from a Texas anti-abortion group, not the Radiance Foundation, whose co-founder appeared in this interview with NPR. Barbara Rogriguez/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Barbara Rogriguez/AP
An anti-abortion billboard with President Barack Obama's image is shown by a vacant lot in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago's South Side Saturday, April 23, 2011. The billboard is from a Texas anti-abortion group, not the Radiance Foundation, whose co-founder appeared in this interview with NPR.

An anti-abortion billboard with President Barack Obama's image is shown by a vacant lot in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago's South Side Saturday, April 23, 2011. The billboard is from a Texas anti-abortion group, not the Radiance Foundation, whose co-founder appeared in this interview with NPR.

Barbara Rogriguez/AP

As part of its "Too Many Aborted" campaign, the Radiance Foundation created many controversial racially-targeted billboards that were taken down on July 10. Today they're releasing videos calling out black leaders for not supporting the pro-life movement. To discuss both sides of the abortion debate, host Michel Martin speaks with Radiance Foundation co-founder Ryan Bomberger and Religious Coalition of Reproductive Choice president and CEO Reverend Carlton Veazey.

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