A Promising Game-Changer In HIV Prevention

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Bottles of antiretroviral drug Truvada, a medicine used in trials that showed a reduction in transmission of HIV between heterosexuals. i

Bottles of antiretroviral drug Truvada, a medicine used in trials that showed a reduction in transmission of HIV between heterosexuals. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Bottles of antiretroviral drug Truvada, a medicine used in trials that showed a reduction in transmission of HIV between heterosexuals.

Bottles of antiretroviral drug Truvada, a medicine used in trials that showed a reduction in transmission of HIV between heterosexuals.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

This week's meeting of the International AIDS Society Conference comes with a CDC study showing a major advance in sexual health. Correspondingly, Botswana trials showed the drug Truvada prevented HIV transmissions in more than 60 percent of heterosexuals. The study's author Dr. Michael Thigpen and host Michel Martin discuss how much Truvada costs, why HIV is so pervasive among women in Botswana, and how much people must take the drug for it to be effective.

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