Dawn Golden And Rosy Cross: A Bed Of Noise

Blacks

3 min 14 sec
 
Dawn Golden and Rosy Cross' "Blacks" sequences dusty    drum machines and serrated computer beats that buffer like a dial-up    modem. i i

Dawn Golden and Rosy Cross' "Blacks" sequences dusty drum machines and serrated computer beats that buffer like a dial-up modem. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the artist
Dawn Golden and Rosy Cross' "Blacks" sequences dusty    drum machines and serrated computer beats that buffer like a dial-up    modem.

Dawn Golden and Rosy Cross' "Blacks" sequences dusty drum machines and serrated computer beats that buffer like a dial-up modem.

Courtesy of the artist

Wednesday's Pick

Song: "Blacks"

Artist: Dawn Golden and Rosy Cross

CD: Blow EP

Genre: Pop

As part of the electronic duo Houses, Dexter Tortoriello crafts hazy, often amorphous music that's more about collages than traditional songs. Built around basic drum loops and field recordings Tortoriello created while living in Hawaii with girlfriend and bandmate Megan Messina, Houses' minimalist, romantic music effectively captures the sensation of being half awake and half asleep.

Tortoriello's latest project, dubbed Dawn Golden and Rosy Cross, retains much of that musical framework and spirit; his debut EP under that moniker, Blow, is another intensely sculpted collection of skittering electronics and delicate acoustic textures. But the songs possess fuller, more structured arrangements marked by heavy beats and synthesizer pads, and as a result, the music feels more aggressive and immediate.

The EP's standout track, "Blacks," successfully showcases this new emphasis by sequencing dusty drum machines and serrated computer beats that buffer like a dial-up modem. The song then mixes that aesthetic with an arsenal of searing synth lines and manipulated live instruments, establishing a thick bed of noise underneath Tortoriello's heavily processed voice.

If Houses' blissed-out songs document the newness of falling in love, Dawn Golden achieves a more remorseful and introspective tone, as if addressing and working through emotional fallout. The result is a deeper collection of songs that points to Tortoriello's ongoing evolution as a producer and songwriter.

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