Economy Blamed For Fewer Las Vegas Weddings

The clerk of Clark County, Nevada, says she issued only about 90,000 marriage licenses last year. That's down from 128,000 in 2004. To make up for the lost income, Vegas chapels are targeting husbands and wives who want to renew their vows.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

(Soundbite of song, "Chapel of Love")

THE DIXIE CUPS (Girl Band): (Singing) Going to the chapel and we're gonna get married. Going to the chapel...

KELLY: Las Vegas may be known as the quickie wedding capital of the country. But an official there says the number of people getting married in Vegas is falling.

Our last word in business today is: not so quick.

The clerk of Clark County, Nevada says she issued only about 90,000 marriage licenses last year. That's down from 128,000 seven years ago. She blames the tough economy. Well, to make up for the lost income, Vegas chapels are targeting husbands and wives who want to renew their vows, and they're offering commitment ceremonies to same-sex couples who can't wed legally.

And that's the business news on this Friday morning from MORNING EDITION, and this is NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(Soundbite of song, "Viva Las Vegas")

Mr. ELVIS PRESLEY (Singer, actor): (Singing) Viva Las Vegas. Viva Las Vegas. Viva Las Vegas. Viva, viva Las Vegas.

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