'Antiques Roadshow' Makes Richest Find In Tulsa

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On Antiques Roadshow, a PBS mainstay, appraisers roll into town and tell people whether all that old stuff around the house is worth anything. At a taping this weekend in Tulsa, you could've been forgiven for thinking you were tuned to Who Wants to be a Millionaire. A man discovered his set of five Chinese cups carved from rhinoceros horn is worth up to $1.5 million, the most expensive item in the show's 16-year history.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

Good morning. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

"Antiques Roadshow" is a PBS mainstay. It's where appraisers roll into town and tell people whether all that old stuff around the house is worth anything. This weekend in Tulsa, you could've been forgiven for thinking you were tuned in to "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?" A man discovered his set of five Chinese cups carved from rhinoceros horn is worth up to $1.5 million, the most expensive item in the show's history.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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