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Wisconsin Professor Wins Bad-Writing Contest

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Wisconsin Professor Wins Bad-Writing Contest

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Wisconsin Professor Wins Bad-Writing Contest

Wisconsin Professor Wins Bad-Writing Contest

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University of Wisconsin professor Sue Fondrie won the Bulwer-Lytton Contest, which asks people to come up with terrible first lines to imaginary novels. Foudrie's winning entry works in dead sparrows and forgotten memories. The contest honors British writer Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, who opened his novel with the immortal words: "It was a dark and stormy night."

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

Good morning. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

Congratulations are in order for University of Wisconsin Professor Sue Fondrie. She won a writing contest for bad writing. The Bulwer-Lytton Contest asks people to come up with terrible first lines to imaginary novels. Fondrie's winning entry manages to work in dead sparrows and forgotten memories. The contest honors a British writer - Edward George Bulwer-Lytton - who opened his novel with these immortal words: It was a dark and stormy night.

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