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Pastries Lure Bears Into Researchers' Traps

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Pastries Lure Bears Into Researchers' Traps

Strange News

Pastries Lure Bears Into Researchers' Traps

Pastries Lure Bears Into Researchers' Traps

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Wildlife officials in Oklahoma are studying the state's growing black bear population. According to Tulsa's KOTV, they've been trapping them using various foods as bait, and they've had the most success with pastries. No word on whether the bears prefer glazed, sprinkled — or maybe a "bear claw."

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

Good morning. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

So much for honey and berries. Turns out, bears prefer doughnuts. Wildlife officials in Oklahoma are studying that state's growing black bear population. According to Tulsa's KOTV, they've been trapping them using various foods as bait, and they've had the most success with pastries. So far, the traps have attracted 300-pound adult males, a 50-pound cub. No word on whether they're turning up for glazed, sprinkled, maybe even a bear claw.

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