Opera Singer Domingo Joins Music Piracy Fight

Spanish tenor Placido Domingo has been appointed chairman of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, a global association of record labels that's fighting digital music piracy. His new job will involve lobbying governments for tougher legislation to fight illegal music downloads.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

Our last word in business today is lending a voice.

Opera singer Placido Domingo has a new leading role. The Spanish tenor has been appointed chairman of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, that's a global association of record labels that's fighting digital music piracy.

(Soundbite of Placido Domingo singing)

KELLY: There you here him there. Domingo says he himself has suffered the loss of royalties and he's concerned about other artists facing financial difficulties if they don't get their due.

His new job will involve lobbying governments for tougher legislation to fight illegal music downloads and other kinds of music piracy.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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