What's New At French McDonald's? Baguettes And Jam

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McDonald's will soon offer fresh breakfast baguettes in its McCafes across France, along with locally made artisanal jams. The French are already big consumers of McDonald's fare, but when it comes to lunch, burger sales still pale in comparison to sales of baguette sandwiches.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Fast-food chains often tweak their menus to appeal to local palates. The Frenchification of America's most famous burger chain has been immortalized in this scene starring John Travolta and Samuel Jackson from the 1994 film "Pulp Fiction."

(Soundbite of movie, "Pulp Fiction")

Mr. JOHN TRAVOLTA (Actor): (as Vincent Vega) You know what they call a Quarter Pounder with cheese in Paris?

Mr. SAMUEL JACKSON (Actor): (as Jules Winnfield) What do they call it?

Mr. TRAVOLTA: They call it a Royale with cheese.

Mr. JACKSON: Royale with cheese.

Mr. TRAVOLTA: That's right.

MONTAGNE: Forget Royale with cheese. McDonald's is really adding some new cuisine to its menus in France, which is why our last word in business this morning is McBaguette.

McDonald's will soon offer fresh breakfast baguettes in its McCafes across France, along with locally made artisanal jams. The French are already big consumers of McDonald's fare, but when it comes to lunch, burger sales still pale in comparison to the sales of traditional baguette sandwiches. So the next new edition to the McDonald's French menu: sandwiches on crusty French bread.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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