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'Bad News Bears' Kid Runs For Congress

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'Bad News Bears' Kid Runs For Congress

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'Bad News Bears' Kid Runs For Congress

'Bad News Bears' Kid Runs For Congress

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David Pollock played one of the kids in the movie made famous in the 1970s. He played Rudi Stein, the nervous kid with glasses who got on base by intentionally getting hit with a pitch. Pollock is running as a Democrat in the new 26th Congressional district in California.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And candidates for Congress and Senate are also making preparations for 2012. That includes a former member of "The Bad News Bears." David Pollock played one of the kids in that 1970s movie. Now he says he's running for Congress as a Democrat from here in California. His website says that over the years David Pollock has worked at a division of Boeing and served as a local elected official. But, of course, many people will remember him as Rudy Stein, the nervous kid with glasses who got on base by intentionally getting hit with a pitch. And in fairness, you could think of worse ways to prepare for today's United States Congress.

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