NPR logo

Hewlett-Packard Pulls The Plug On TouchPad

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139777076/139777416" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Hewlett-Packard Pulls The Plug On TouchPad

Business

Hewlett-Packard Pulls The Plug On TouchPad

Hewlett-Packard Pulls The Plug On TouchPad

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139777076/139777416" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After launching its new tablet just weeks ago, H-P announced on Thursday it is stopping production of the TouchPad. At best, the TouchPad got a lukewarm reception from critics.

DAVID GREENE, host:

One thing consumers won't be paying more for - or anything at all, for that matter - is Hewlett-Packard's TouchPad.

Our last word in business today is you can't touch this.

After launching its new tablet just weeks ago, HP announced yesterday it's pulling the plug on the TouchPad.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

The TouchPad got, at best, a lukewarm reception from critics. One early sign all was not well with the new product was the $100 price drop just after it was launched.

GREENE: Then reports started circulating that Best Buy had sold less than 10 percent of the 270,000 TouchPads in its inventory. HP is the world's largest desktop and laptop computer seller. The company also revealed yesterday that it is considering spinning off or selling its personal computing business.

And that is the business news from MORNING EDITION, on NPR News. I'm David Greene.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.