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Striking Verizon Workers End Strike Without Deal

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Striking Verizon Workers End Strike Without Deal

Business

Striking Verizon Workers End Strike Without Deal

Striking Verizon Workers End Strike Without Deal

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139843557/139843536" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tens of thousands of Verizon workers plan to go back to work this week after a strike that began earlier this month. Their union did not reach an agreement with management, but talks will continue. The strike was to protest company demands that workers pay more toward their health care premiums.

DAVID GREENE, host:

NPR's business news starts with Verizon workers back online.

(Soundbite of music)

GREENE: Tens of thousands of Verizon workers plan to go back to work this week after a strike that began earlier this month. Their union did not reach an agreement with management, but talks will continue. The strike was to protest company demands that workers pay more towards their health care premiums.

Verizon wants other concessions, such as a freeze on pensions. The company says it needs to cut costs to offset declining sales in its landline unit. Union officials say with overall company earnings still on the rise, and executive pay still high, workers should not have to cut benefits.

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