NPR logo
Moscow's Torn Up Sidewalks Force Shoe Changes
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139843561/139843542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Moscow's Torn Up Sidewalks Force Shoe Changes

Business

Moscow's Torn Up Sidewalks Force Shoe Changes

Moscow's Torn Up Sidewalks Force Shoe Changes
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139843561/139843542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The mayor of Moscow is replacing the city's asphalt sidewalks with bricks. Moscow women are known for tottering in super high spiked heels. It's hard enough to walk in 5-inch heels on an ordinary day, so it must be especially precarious to navigate ripped up pavement.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today comes from Moscow, where the mayor has been ripping up the city's sidewalks and replacing the existing asphalt with more stylish-looking brick.

The word is fashion agonistas.

DAVID GREENE, host:

Moscow's Mayor Sergei Sobianin explains that the bricks are more environmentally friendly. He says they last longer and that they make the city look a lot more European.

MONTAGNE: Be that as it may, the project is changing the look of the city's fashionistas. Moscow women are known for tottering in super-high spiked heels. It's hard enough to walk in five-inch heels on an ordinary day, so it must be especially precarious to navigate ripped up pavement.

Even when the sidewalks are finished, those spiked heels could easily get stuck in-between the brick.

GREENE: And so there might be a permanent change in Moscow's style. The New York Times reports that some women have started wearing wedges, even flats.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: Which, by the way, are at least as fashionable.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.